3 Little Known Techniques CISSPs Use to Find Jobs

CISSP Jobs

There are many ways to land a job that requires the CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional) certification. In this post, I share three methods to empower you to find your ideal job, leveraging your CISSP certification. I hope these techniques enable you to land a job in cybersecurity that resonates with you.

#1: Research CISSP Job Openings

You should research CISSP job openings for where you are considering moving or the location you are seeking a job. According to CyberSeek, there are currently 77,492 open jobs in the United States that require the CISSP certification. Of the 77,492 open CISSP jobs, 2,031 are in the Public Sector and 75,465 are in the Private Sector.

Job openings in the United States that require the CISSP certification. The orange number represents CISSP certification holders. The blue number represents openings requesting the CISSP certification. (Click to Expand)

CISSP jobs in Arkansas. (Click to Enlarge)

If you live in Arkansas and want to stay in Arkansas, as an example, there are 265 open CISSP jobs in the entire state of Arkansas.

If you want to move to Texas, for example, there are 6,333 open CISSP jobs in Texas.

#2: Determine Which Organizations Hire People with the CISSP Certification

This technique involves you actively seeking a CISSP job.

There are several paths you can take:

  1. you can work for the DoD as an actual DoD employee (civilian or military)

  2. you can work for the DoD as a contractor

  3. you can work in the private sector

Steps to become part of the DoD as a DoD civilian or member of the military are beyond the scope of this article. I will focus on numbers two and three above. If you are seeking a job as a DoD contractor or in the private sector, the process is the same because private companies that have DoD contracts hire DoD contractors. Private companies also hire CISSPs for private sector work.

A good place to determine which companies are hiring CISSPs is indeed.com. As of this writing, there are 13,469 open CISSP jobs in the United States listed on Indeed.

Jobs (13,469) on indeed.com that require the CISSP Certification.

Jobs (13,469) on indeed.com that require the CISSP Certification.

According to indeed.com, the company Deloitte has 514 open CISSP jobs and Washington, DC has 765 openings for people with the CISSP certification.

Another source to determine which organizations are hiring CISSPs is LinkedIn. Do a search for "CISSP" in LinkedIn and set the focus of the results to "Jobs"

As you can see from the screenshot below, there are 25,997 open jobs in the United States that required the CISSP certification.

Number of openings, sorted by company, for people with the CISSP certification. (Click to Enlarge)

Number of openings, sorted by city, for people with the CISSP certification. (Click to Enlarge)

LinkedIn search for CISSP Jobs (showing 25,997 CISSP job openings), sorted by Company. (Click to Enlarge)


#3: Update your LinkedIn profile with your CISSP certification

This technique involves you passively seeking a CISSP job.

Many employers, recruiters, and headhunters use LinkedIn to search for people with the CISSP certification. Listing your CISSP certification on your LinkedIn profile will make you show up in searches for "CISSP".

LinkedIn search for CISSP, sorted by People. (Click to Enlarge)

In the screenshot above, I searched for CISSP, then switched the results to "People". As you notice, one guy even listed "Studying for CISSP Exam" in his LinkedIn “Headline” and he showed up. The second person put it after their name, like "John Smith, CISSP". The third person listed the CISSP certification as their LinkedIn Headline. Any of these approaches work to get the attention of employers, recruiters, and headhunters. Just be prepared to be bombarded with "incredible opportunities" and lots of new connection requests.

Conclusion

I hope you find these strategies useful in your hunt for your ideal CISSP job. If you are seeking a CISSP certification, consider taking one of Alpine Security’s CISSP Bootcamps.

 
Learn More About Alpine Security's CISSP Course

Author Bio

Christian riding a camel and geeking out at the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt

Christian Espinosa is Alpine Security's CEO/Founder and a Cybersecurity Professor at Maryville University. He holds over 25 certifications, including the CISSP, CCISO, and PMP. Christian is a US Air Force veteran with a BS in Engineering from the US Air Force Academy and MBA from Webster University. Christian holds multiple patents on cybersecurity attack and defense. Major recent projects include penetration testing and assessments of commercial aircraft, medical device penetration testing, and numerous incident response projects. When Christian isn’t protecting us from cybercriminals, he climbs mountains, travels the world, teaches outdoor wilderness survival, and competes in Ironman triathlons.